Garden Design – Small Garden Design Ideas

Small garden design ideas are not simple to find. The small garden design is unique from other garden designs. Space plays an essential role in small garden design ideas. The garden should not seem very populated but at the same time it should give a complete whole to the home.

Only trees and the length of the garden are not enough. Textures can also play a big role in increasing the length of a small garden. However you can select your texture, you may also use brick for the patio area, natural stone for the walking space and a crushed rock that differentiate with the environments for the remaining of the area.

Herb garden

Suffering from small space does not mean you should do with out a herb garden. Delight in the truth that herbs need not take up a lot of space. Usually garden design concentrates on huge borders, flower beds and lawns and there is little instruction available about herb garden design in a small space. The challenges of designing a small herb garden can really be summarised in to these thoughts:

* The complete garden will be on look as a whole. There is no room for hidden paths or even division in to individual rooms.

* Small space means you must make choices. You can not develop every plant you love. You can not on impulse see a plant and purchase it just hoping there will be space for it.

* You have to limit your selection of colour of blooms. Do not create the plot too busy with shiny colour, stick to pastels as that will create your plot look bigger than to it is.

Gardening in a Small Space

Break up the current soil in your garden and add bagged or compost garden soil. The earlier you start, the better, so you can get to work on this part the assignment in the winter or fall.

Still in the outlining stages, get a walk around your surrounding and look in to what other folks have done with their small garden. Go to a historic space of row houses and see what types of gardens those folk have built. You do not have to be a copycat but beautiful gardens in other small spaces can be an inspiration.

Look down the gardens along your row of homes. How that would produce the look and experience of your complete neighborhood. If there are not a many gardens, maybe you can give inspiration to your neighbors and change your complete neighborhood in to a wonderful botanical paradise.

Small Garden Design – How to Get Started

So, you have decided to start a small garden, but where should you start? The first step in any small garden design project is planning the type of garden you want to grow.

Do you want a small garden with lots of color? Will you want flowers that you can cut and bring indoors? If so, then you will want to think about flower garden design. Do you want to combine an interest in cooking with a small vegetable garden design or an herb garden design? Maybe you want to consider a combination garden.

Once you have a starting point on the type of garden you want, before you start your small garden design, you need to consider a few things…

What is your planting zone?

How many hours of sun does your garden area get during the day?

Does the amount of sun change during the day or the seasons?

If your garden is in a small portion of a yard, what else is already growing in that area?

Let’s start with your planting zone. What is a planting zone? In North America, the USDA has created a Hardiness Zone Map that divides North America into 11 different planting zones. A low and high range of temperatures defines each zone. While there are limitations to using a zone map, it will give you some idea of whether a plant will survive in your climate.

Some sources for finding planting zone information are on the back of seed packets, in the plant description, and on the internet. This information will not only help you determine if a plant can survive in your climate range, but how early you can plant a particular plant in your location. While zone maps are not perfect, they can provide a useful start to determining the plants to use in your small garden design.

One of most important factors in determining the types of plants you can use as you develop your small garden design will be the amount of sun you get in the area you want to plant. Whether it is a container garden for your patio, deck, balcony, or rooftop or a small area in your yard where you are going to plant, you need to spend some time evaluating the amount of sun you get in that area. Do you get full sun for 6 to 8 hours a day? Is the area in the sun in the morning and shade in the afternoon or shade in the morning and sun in the afternoon?

The amount of sun you receive in your planting area will determine whether you can plant sun-loving plants, shade plants, or plants that can take part sun/part shade. Armed with the information about your planting zone and the amount of sunlight in your area, the next step will be to start determining the types of plants you want in your small garden design. Now the fun starts…

Small Garden Design: What You Need to Do

For people who love plants, a small garden is a curse. But it shouldn’t be. As a matter of fact, small gardens can be such a delight if you apply small garden designs that make your space look a lot bigger.

Sure, having a small garden is not as grand as having acres of land devoted solely for gardening. But when it comes to setup and maintenance, a small garden is a winner. You don’t need a whole lot of plants just to make the garden filled with life. You only need a couple of key elements during your start up, and you’re good to go.

There are a couple of things to consider before planting. The following should be included in planning your small garden design:

  1. Budget constraints – Having a small garden may seem less costly than having an expansive one. However, there are still expenses involved especially if you want your garden to look its best. If you cannot afford to buy all the plants and ornaments you need at once, deal with the most needed at the moment. You can always build a collection of plants over the months once you have your budget sorted out.
  2. Selection of plants – Some plants thrive in shady areas, while others bask under the sun. Consider where you’re going to place your plants so that you won’t have to risk them withering due to inappropriate conditions. You might also want to look into having perennials instead of annuals or biennials as the former thrive longer. This means you don’t have to redo your garden design often since you can count on your plants to simply grow back again.
  3. Focal point – Gardens are about not only flowers, trees and plants. They are also about focal points or centerpieces in your garden. A focal point serves as a balancing add-on to your garden. It helps emphasize your garden design by guiding the eye toward the midpoint. Without a focal point, your garden will simply look like a hodgepodge of plants lopsidedly placed on the ground. Without a center, your garden will look more of a jungle.
  4. Layers or rooms – The problem with a small garden is that it can’t accommodate all the plants that you want. By building layers, you get to place varieties of plants in smaller areas, thereby giving your garden character. Before you do the layering, ask your local gardening stores which plants grow tall and which do not so that you’ll have a successful layered design for your garden.